Healthy nibbles

BRAZIL NUT

BRAZIL NUT

DID YOU KNOW?
Native to the Amazon and Negro river basins
The Amazonia (Brazil) nut is native to the Amazon and Negro river basins. Bolivia, Peru and Brazil are the producing countries. The Brazil nut is the most economically important plant product that is harvested sustainably in the Amazonian rain forest. Close to 70% of the world’s supply comes from the Pando region, an area that represents just 3% of the Amazon forest.
BENIFITS
Nutrients
Brazil nuts are high in fiber, vitamin E (α-tocopherol), thiamin and minerals such as selenium, potassium, zinc, magnesium, phosphorus, copper and manganese. They are also a source of calcium and iron.1,2
Selenium
Brazil nuts contain more selenium (1917 mcg/100 g) than any other food.3
Magnesium
Of all nuts, Brazil nuts contain the highest amount of magnesium (376 mg/100 g).
Cognitive function
A 2016 scientific study has suggested that eating Brazil nuts may restore selenium deficiency and may have positive effects on some cognitive functions in elderly people with mild cognitive impairment.3 Another study published in 2008 concluded that the inclusion of this high-selenium food in the diet could prevent the need for fortification or supplements to improve selenium levels. 4
FUN FACTS
The Brazil nut trees are one of the tallest trees of the Amazon Basin’s tropical rainforest, reaching up to 50 m in height.5,6 BRAZIL NUT
BRAZIL NUT
The fruit of the Brazil nut tree is a large round capsule (10-12 cm in diameter) with a hard woody wall containing 10-25 seeds (commonly known as Brazil nuts) and weighing 0.5-2.5 kg.7
References:

1)    USDA Food Composition Databases. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 28 slightly revised May, 2016: https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/search/list.
2)    Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 December 2006 on nutrition and health claims made on foods: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/HTML/?uri=CELEX:32006R1924&from=en.
3)    National Institutes of Health (NIH). U.S. Department of Health & Human Services: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Selenium-HealthProfessional/
4)    Cardoso, B. R., Apolinário, D., da Silva Bandeira, V., Busse, A. L., Magaldi, R. M., Jacob-Filho, W., & Cozzolino, S. M. F. (2016). Effects of Brazil nut consumption on selenium status and cognitive performance in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: a randomized controlled pilot trial. European journal of nutrition, 55(1), 107-116.
5)    Thomson, C. D., Chisholm, A., McLachlan, S. K., & Campbell, J. M. (2008). Brazil nuts: an effective way to improve selenium status. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 87(2), 379-384.
6)    Martin, R. M., & Killmann, W. (2005). Microfinance and forest-based small-scale enterprises. FAO Forestry Paper, 146.
7)    Clay, J. W., & Clement, C. R. (1993). Selected species and strategies to enhance income generation from Amazonian forests. Rome: Food and agriculture organization of the United Nations.